Mommy's Juice!: Help, I'm Out of Baby Waffles   

Friday, July 26, 2013

Help, I'm Out of Baby Waffles


Time out is a bitch, just when I need it most too! I admit, I'm not the most fantastic disciplinarian on the planet. And yes, my boys may take advantage of that fact sometimes. But I do discipline, and time out I thought was a winner. When Jackson was younger I could put him in his room, lock the door, and wait for however long it took him to stop the tantrum in progress. Job well done! Recently though Jackson has discovered how to unlock the door from the inside, leaving me standing on the other side holding it shut as he pulls with all his might on the other side. Not exactly the most fun.

So as we work on new time-out solutions for Jackson, we move on to Trey. At two years old his tantrums are really a special treat. Like just this morning when I made him mini-pancakes for breakfast which he took one look at and began screaming and crying at the top of his lungs, "I wanted baby waffles!!!!!" I'm no Paula Deen but I'm pretty damn sure baby pancakes and baby waffles covered in syrup the way this child requests taste EXACTLY THE SAME! And yet, his tantrum went to a level that led me to deliver him to his crib for a time-out. The crib is a life saver, I can leave him in as long as need too knowing he is safe, and save my own sanity if only for a few minutes. Until today that is.... Trey can now get out of his crib on his own. Something I learned when the screaming demon was back at my feet two minutes after time-out began. Shocked to see him standing there I realized, yet another time-out down the drain.

What next? Do I have my husband extend the crib frame to the ceiling? Do I install padlocks on their doors? Do I invest in chains? Whatever the solution, I'll need it soon, I'm out of baby waffles.

10 comments:

  1. Watch a few episodes of Super Nanny! ;) Your kids need to learn that you mean business and they need to respect you, not be locked in anywhere. It'll be a really long, exhausting process for a while, but keep walking them back to the timeout spot till they know you won't give in. Even if it takes two hours. It will get shorter the more consistent you are. Put in the hard work now so they'll respect you as teens when you can't lock them in! Lots of deep breaths during the disciplining! Oh, & try to keep it positive, "yes you can ____ once you finish your timeout." Rather than "no you can't ___." For my kids, "No" stops them listening instantly ;)

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  2. this parenting gig is tough business.... the littles want what they want when they want it --gah. I think what worked best for me and mine, was not allowing them to get a reaction out of me or giving in. My kids were never one to throw many tantrums because I'd leave 'em there to throw it, so it lost its power. It is a power struggle that is best won while they are young; I prefer putting toys in timeout and if their behavior does not improve I put another toy in timeout, and if that doesn't work I get out a garbage bag and clear out their room... the garbage bag technique was only used once, and then the toys had to be earned back. Good luck to ya, Mama.

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  3. I am going to watch this thread carefully. I dread having to face the time out situation (much moreso with multiples) but I know it is rapidly approaching. I don't know if I can deal with the time out spot as I might be tempted to put them in their room too...

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  4. I hate tantrums. I don't get the little kid ones anymore, but the teenage ones (of course, they know how far they can go with me, and the road is not long). I kinda prefer the little kid ones. Good luck!

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  5. I think Leah had some good advice there. You do have to show you're in charge, because kids are just smart. They can figure out countless ways to test you.

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  6. There is a book called 1-2-3 Magic that is very helpful for strong-willed kids. I have two boys, one of who will go to time out and stay and one who still won't go and makes it very difficult. 1-2-3 is helpful because it helps them make a better choice before they get to time out. When we are consistent with it, it works very well. Now that my 5 year old is almost 6, I give him a choice. He can go to time out voluntarily and it's 3 minutes, but if I have to take him there it's 5. That seems to be working too for now. Good luck! This parenting gig is hard work!

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  7. I'm going through the horrible temper tantrums now as well and I sometimes I feel I could hearing ringing in my ears because it gets so painful to listen to. He used to act up a lot at Gymboree or when we go out but now I just take him away from the things he likes to do or take things away from him if he's naughty. Sometimes when it's really bad, I let him cry his heart out and pretend not to hear him. Sometimes when we're out in public and he has a crazy one, I let him cry, he gets louder, and people think I'm crazy. I never care though because they aren't the ones who have to deal with him.

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  8. I agree with Leigh, I used to watch Super Nanny to get tips and ideas on how to get my kids in line. I had to get serious with my kids when they were younger to stay in timeout. It would eventually work especially when you don't make eye contact with your child. My youngest still hasn't figured out how to climb out of his crib, thankfully. We don't have to use that as time out very often but he fusses every time we go lay him down. My older son learned to climb out of his crib at 10 months old, it was tough.

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  9. Ohhhh my hahahaha! I think you are hilarious! My little man is only 10 months so the most I have to deal with is saying no no and he turning and screaming at me then continue to do it. I'm not looking forward to the toddler stage!

    railroadmomma.wordpress.com

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  10. trouble! good luck! it's always something, isn't it?! this parenting stuff ain't for the faint of heart ;)

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